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HISTORY: Artesia Declares June LGBTQ Month

By Tammye McDuff

For the first time in the history of the city of Artesia, the City Council unanimously passed the resolution declaring June at LGBTQ pride month.

“In recent weeks our country has cried out for change. We must continue the march toward equality for everyone,” said Mayor pro tem Rene Trevino, “June is Pride Month and should be celebrated … let us never forget that we all breathe the same air and bleed the same blood.”

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in Manhattan. The Stonewall Uprising was a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. In the United States the last Sunday in June was initially celebrated as “Gay Pride Day,”

June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising.

In a resolution passed at the City Council meeting on June 8th, the City of Artesia stated:

”Individuals of the LGBTQ community continue to live in fear and struggle to experience equality, justice and the opportunity to prosper. Various advancements have been made with respect to equal treatment for LGBTQ individuals throughout the country and in remembering the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots that gave birth to the LGBTQ civil rights movements, this City Council does resolve to declare June as LGBTQ Pride month in the City.”

 The Council invites all residents in celebrating the culture, accomplishments and contributions of the LGBTQ community and encourages all residents to work to help advance equality for these individuals and their families.

Council woman Melissa Ramoso added, “With everything going on, for this moment I’d like to announce that the City of Artesia for the first time in its history has declared June as LGBTQ Month. We amended the resolution to include not only the history and impacts of the community, but also recognize what the community has gone through such as hate crimes, HIV/AIDS and suicide. What a tremendous first step and look forward to bringing the conversation of possibly flying the Pride Flag next year.”

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