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Seven Birds Die from West Nile Virus in Cerritos

 By Brian Hews

Seven dead birds that have tested positive with the highly contagious West Nile Virus have been located in Cerritos during August and September, Hews Media Group-Community Newspaper can confirm.

 

 

In addition, a hand full of WNV-Positive birds were located in Lakewood and Artesia during the same period.

According to officials from Southern California Vector Control Authority, birds that are infected with WNV will not appear ill at first. WNV can cause serious illness and death in some birds.

The most severe illnesses are seen among the corvids (including crows, jays, ravens, and magpies). Dead American Crows are the most commonly reported bird infected with WNV.

In La Mirada, five infected mosquitos carrying the virus were located in traps in August.

In Cerritos, two infected mosquitos were also found in August.

Orange County is currently experiencing the highest level of West Nile virus infection in mosquitoes ever recorded in the United States.

So far, three local Orange County residents have died after contracting the virus. The most concentrated area in Orange County where WNV has been found is in Santa Ana and Anaheim. “Despite collaborative efforts with the City of Santa Ana to reduce mosquito-breeding sources, expand education to residents, conduct aerial surveillance for out-of-service swimming pools, and intensifying immature mosquito control, the rate of infection in both mosquitoes and birds remains abnormally high,” a spokesperson for the OC Vector Control Department said on Monday.

Due to these factors, the Orange County Vector Control District (OCVCD) will conduct truck-mounted mosquito control treatments in strategic locations in the City of Santa Ana.

Residents in the areas of the application will receive information about the applications from the City of Santa Ana and OCVCD in advance. If you find a bird that has recently died, particularly a crow or other corvid, please contact Westnile.ca.gov.

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